Prof. Jan Whittington Dr. Jan Whittington is Associate Professor of the Department of Urban Design and Planning, at the University of Washington, Seattle. Her research applies transaction cost economic theory to networked infrastructures, such as transportation, water, and communications systems, to internalize factors historically treated as external to transactions. Her publications include methodologies for greenhouse gas mitigation and resilience through capital investment planning, examination of the efficiency of public-private contractual arrangements for infrastructure, and the evaluation of online transactions for efficiency, security, and privacy. At the University of Washington, she is the Director of the Urban Infrastructure Lab, Associate Director of the Center for Information Assurance and Cybersecurity, and Affiliate Faculty at the Tech Policy Lab.

Prof. Jan Whittington

Dr. Jan Whittington is Associate Professor of the Department of Urban Design and Planning, at the University of Washington, Seattle. Her research applies transaction cost economic theory to networked infrastructures, such as transportation, water, and communications systems, to internalize factors historically treated as external to transactions. Her publications include methodologies for greenhouse gas mitigation and resilience through capital investment planning, examination of the efficiency of public-private contractual arrangements for infrastructure, and the evaluation of online transactions for efficiency, security, and privacy. At the University of Washington, she is the Director of the Urban Infrastructure Lab, Associate Director of the Center for Information Assurance and Cybersecurity, and Affiliate Faculty at the Tech Policy Lab.

Mark Hallenbeck Mark Hallenbeck is the Director of the Washington State Transportation Center (TRAC) office located at the University of Washington. He has been with TRAC for 26 years, after working for four years as a consultant in Washington, D.C. Much of Mark's research at TRAC involves the collection, use, summarization, and reporting of data that describe urban roadway performance and then the use of those statistics in making major transportation and land use investment decisions. He is currently working with the Washington State Department of Transportation to develop performance reporting systems that can report on changes in travel behavior caused by actions implemented in the name of "Smart Growth," "VMT reduction," or "CO2 emission reduction."

Mark Hallenbeck

Mark Hallenbeck is the Director of the Washington State Transportation Center (TRAC) office located at the University of Washington. He has been with TRAC for 26 years, after working for four years as a consultant in Washington, D.C. Much of Mark's research at TRAC involves the collection, use, summarization, and reporting of data that describe urban roadway performance and then the use of those statistics in making major transportation and land use investment decisions. He is currently working with the Washington State Department of Transportation to develop performance reporting systems that can report on changes in travel behavior caused by actions implemented in the name of "Smart Growth," "VMT reduction," or "CO2 emission reduction."

Prof. Bill Howe Bill Howe is Associate Professor in the Information School, Adjunct Associate Professor in Computer Science & Engineering, and Associate Director of the UW eScience Institute. His research interests are in data management, curation, analytics, and visualization in the sciences. Howe played a leadership role in the Data Science Environment program at UW through a $32.8 million grant awarded jointly to UW, NYU, and UC Berkeley. With support from the MacArthur Foundation and Microsoft, Howe leads UW's participation in the national MetroLab Network focused on smart cities and data-intensive urban science.  He has received two Jim Gray Seed Grant awards from Microsoft Research for work on managing environmental data. He has a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Portland State University and a Bachelor's degree in Industrial & Systems Engineering from Georgia Tech.

Prof. Bill Howe

Bill Howe is Associate Professor in the Information School, Adjunct Associate Professor in Computer Science & Engineering, and Associate Director of the UW eScience Institute. His research interests are in data management, curation, analytics, and visualization in the sciences. Howe played a leadership role in the Data Science Environment program at UW through a $32.8 million grant awarded jointly to UW, NYU, and UC Berkeley. With support from the MacArthur Foundation and Microsoft, Howe leads UW's participation in the national MetroLab Network focused on smart cities and data-intensive urban science.  He has received two Jim Gray Seed Grant awards from Microsoft Research for work on managing environmental data. He has a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Portland State University and a Bachelor's degree in Industrial & Systems Engineering from Georgia Tech.

 
Meg Young Meg is a social scientist and researcher of downstream impacts of emerging technology, especially those adopted by governments. She is a PhD candidate in the Information School conducting research in the Urban Infrastructure Lab and Tech Policy Lab. Her work considers data access, privacy, proprietorship, and ethics in 'smart cities' data collection and sharing. She has an MS in Information and a BA in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Michigan.

Meg Young

Meg is a social scientist and researcher of downstream impacts of emerging technology, especially those adopted by governments. She is a PhD candidate in the Information School conducting research in the Urban Infrastructure Lab and Tech Policy Lab. Her work considers data access, privacy, proprietorship, and ethics in 'smart cities' data collection and sharing. She has an MS in Information and a BA in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Michigan.

Feiyang Sun Feiyang is a PhD student in the Department of Urban Design and Planning in the College of Built Environments. He is an RA in the Urban Infrastructure Lab. 

Feiyang Sun

Feiyang is a PhD student in the Department of Urban Design and Planning in the College of Built Environments. He is an RA in the Urban Infrastructure Lab. 

Boyang Sa Boyang is a PhD student in the Department of Urban Design and Planning in the College of Built Environment. He is a member of the Urban Infrastructure Lab. Boyang is interested in looking at policies on transportation related urban issues, including public transit, autonomous vehicles, and congestion relieving. He has a Master of Regional Planning at Cornell University and a BA in Geography at the University of Washington.  

Boyang Sa

Boyang is a PhD student in the Department of Urban Design and Planning in the College of Built Environment. He is a member of the Urban Infrastructure Lab. Boyang is interested in looking at policies on transportation related urban issues, including public transit, autonomous vehicles, and congestion relieving. He has a Master of Regional Planning at Cornell University and a BA in Geography at the University of Washington.